Bart Wallet Professor of Jewish Studies

Bart Wallet appointed professor of Jewish Studies

Dr Bart Wallet has been appointed professor of Jewish Studies: Early Modern and Modern Jewish History, with a special focus on Amsterdam, at the University of Amsterdam’s (UvA) Faculty of Humanities. The chair was established in collaboration with, and with support from, the Menasseh ben Israel Institute Foundation.

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Bart Wallet Hoogleraar

Dr. Bart Wallet is benoemd tot hoogleraar Joodse studies: vroegmoderne en moderne Joodse geschiedenis, in het bijzonder in Amsterdam, aan de Faculteit der Geesteswetenschappen van de Universiteit van Amsterdam. De leerstoel is ingesteld in samenwerking met en met steun van de Stichting Menasseh ben Israel Instituut.

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AYS 14 NL

Marion Aptroot (ed.): Yiddish Knights, Amsterdam Yiddish Symposium 14, (ISBN 978-90-829674-0-1, 64 pp, Amsterdam 2020). € 7,50 bestellen Yiddish literature is a Jewish literature. It is also a European literature and its literary materials and forms reflect contacts with Jewish and non-Jewish cultures. It is therefore not surprising that we find Yiddish texts about knights

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Do we need to decolonize Dutch-Jewish History, and, if so, how?

The 15th International Symposium on Dutch Jewish History and Culture, ‘The Imperial Turn in Dutch Jewish History’, has been postponed until 4-5 October 2021. As compensation and appetizer, we are organizing an online round table on the topic: Do we need to decolonize Dutch-Jewish history, and if so, how? Participants:Monique Alberts, Head Librarian/archivist

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Vernieuwde Studia Rosenthaliana uit

Met het dubblenummer The Jewish Bookshop of the World; Aspects of Print and Manuscript Culture in Early Modern Amsterdam is de vernieuwde Studia Rosenthaliana uit, als open access tijdschrift, dus ditmaal geheel gratis online te lezen.

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PoliticsofJewishLiterature

online conference: THE POLITICS OF JEWISH LITERATURE AND THE MAKING OF POSTWAR EUROPE Jewish literature — by which we understand all literature that is perceived or labeled as Jewish by critics, readers, publishers and/or authors — has struck a powerful chord in postwar European culture. Its unprecedented popularity can be discerned in the

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